middie

[mid-ee]

Origin of middie

see origin at middy1

middy

1
[mid-ee]
noun, plural mid·dies.
  1. Informal. a midshipman.
  2. middy blouse.

Origin of middy

1
First recorded in 1825–35; mid(shipman) + -y2

middy

2
[mid-ee]
noun, plural mid·dies. Australian Slang.
  1. a medium-size drinking glass commonly holding half a pint and used for beer.

Origin of middy

2
First recorded in 1940–45; mid1 + -y2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for middies

Historical Examples of middies

  • We had a few extempore concerts in one of the middies' berths.

    A Boy's Voyage Round the World

    The Son of Samuel Smiles

  • “We shall do it, my lads,” whispered the lieutenant to the middies.

    Hunting the Skipper

    George Manville Fenn

  • Drop the father, and never go to him with tales; he has to treat you middies all alike.

    Syd Belton

    George Manville Fenn

  • We put our evening skirts and middies and slippers in the hammock of our berths.

  • Not but what the middies are apprenticed just as sure as we are.


British Dictionary definitions for middies

middie

noun
  1. Australian a glass or bottle containing 285ml of beer

middy

noun plural -dies
  1. informal See midshipman (def. 1)
  2. See middy blouse
  3. Australian a middle-sized glass of beer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for middies

middy

n.

colloquial abbreviation of midshipman, by 1818. As "loose, long type of women's blouse," 1911, from resemblance to shirts worn by midshipmen.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper