middy

1
[mid-ee]
See more synonyms for middy on Thesaurus.com

Origin of middy

1
First recorded in 1825–35; mid(shipman) + -y2

middy

2
[mid-ee]
noun, plural mid·dies. Australian Slang.
  1. a medium-size drinking glass commonly holding half a pint and used for beer.

Origin of middy

2
First recorded in 1940–45; mid1 + -y2
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for middy

Historical Examples of middy

  • She was wearing a middy blouse, and that made her look five years younger.

    The Wall Street Girl

    Frederick Orin Bartlett

  • “No, Tom, I certainly could not,” said the middy decisively.

    Hunting the Skipper

    George Manville Fenn

  • “No; we have got something else to think of, Tom,” said the middy sternly.

    Hunting the Skipper

    George Manville Fenn

  • “Then I feel disposed to do it,” cried the middy passionately.

    Hunting the Skipper

    George Manville Fenn

  • Now then, you two,” cried the middy angrily, “you have been asleep!

    Hunting the Skipper

    George Manville Fenn


British Dictionary definitions for middy

middy

noun plural -dies
  1. informal See midshipman (def. 1)
  2. See middy blouse
  3. Australian a middle-sized glass of beer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for middy
n.

colloquial abbreviation of midshipman, by 1818. As "loose, long type of women's blouse," 1911, from resemblance to shirts worn by midshipmen.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper