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View synonyms for mid

mid

1

[ mid ]

adjective

  1. being at or near the middle point of:

    We visited in mid autumn to catch the leaves at their best.

    The group was active in the mid 1890s.

  2. being or occupying a middle place or position:

    These socks hit at the mid calf, making them good for wearing with boots.

    The bark mid trunk has been eaten away by insects.

  3. Phonetics. (of a vowel) articulated with an opening above the tongue relatively intermediate between those for high and low: the vowels of beet, bet, and bot are respectively high, mid, and low. Compare high ( def 23 ), low 1( def 30 ).
  4. Slang. mediocre, unimpressive, or disappointing:

    Everyone thinks that show is so great, but I've always thought it was mid.

    The shoes are really mid but the shirt is cute.



noun

  1. Archaic. the middle.

mid

2
or 'mid

[ mid ]

preposition

mid

3

[ mid ]

noun

, Informal.
  1. a midshipman.

mid-

4
  1. a combining form representing mid1 in compound words:

    midday; mid-Victorian.

mid.

5

abbreviation for

  1. middle.

Mid.

6

abbreviation for

  1. Midshipman.

M.I.D.

7

abbreviation for

  1. Master of Industrial Design.

mid.

1

abbreviation for

  1. middle


mid

2

/ mɪd /

preposition

  1. a poetic word for amid

mid

3

/ mɪd /

adjective

  1. phonetics of, relating to, or denoting a vowel whose articulation lies approximately halfway between high and low, such as e in English bet

noun

  1. an archaic word for middle

mid-

4

combining_form

  1. indicating a middle part, point, time, or position

    mid-April

    midday

    mid-Victorian

Mid.

5

abbreviation for

  1. Midshipman
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Word History and Origins

Origin of mid1

First recorded before 900; Middle English, Old English midd- (both an adjective and the initial element of a compound; modern spellings such as mid autumn are probably a reanalysis of the combining form mid- as an adjective); cognate with Old High German mitti, Old Norse mithr, Gothic midjis; akin to Greek mésos, méssos, méttos, Latin medius, Old Church Slavonic mežda “limit, border,” Old Irish mide, Sanskrit madhya “middle”; mid-

Origin of mid2

By shortening

Origin of mid3

Middle English, Old English; mid 1
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Word History and Origins

Origin of mid1

C12 midre (inflected form of midd, unattested); related to Old Norse mithr, Gothic midjis

Origin of mid2

Old English; see middle , mid 1
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Example Sentences

In the mid-afternoon, Ramos and Liu were parked on Tomkins Avenue on a meal break.

But with the outbreak of hostilities in mid-2011, all festivities were thrust into the deep freeze.

Think of the embarrassing subway platform or mid-office “adjustment” debacles you could avoid!

And Asians also showed a shift toward the GOP in the mid-terms.

My bike ride that mid-October day starts like so many others.

We had now approached closely to the foot of the mountain-ranges, and their lofty summits were high above us in mid-air.

So they often occured mid-paragraph; here they have been moved to a more appropriate place.

Monsieur Farival thought that Victor should have been taken out in mid-ocean in his earliest youth and drowned.

While she flitted into the next room to fetch a stamp, Mrs. Haughstone, her needles arrested in mid-air, looked steadily at Tom.

It was a room without beauty, merely walls, repapered once every twenty years, and furniture of the mid-Victorian era.

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