millimeter

[mil-uh-mee-ter]
Also especially British, mil·li·me·tre.

Origin of millimeter

From the French word millimètre, dating back to 1800–10. See milli-, meter1
Related formsmil·li·met·ric [mil-uh-me-trik] /ˌmɪl əˈmɛ trɪk/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for millimetric

Historical Examples of millimetric

  • The arms are then extended along the cross rod which is marked with a millimetric scale.

    Pedagogical Anthropology

    Maria Montessori

  • The curves are measured by means of the millimetric tape; the diameters by means of the calipers.

    Pedagogical Anthropology

    Maria Montessori


Word Origin and History for millimetric

millimeter

n.

also millimetre, 1802, from French millimetre; see milli- + meter (n.2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

millimetric in Medicine

millimeter

[mĭlə-mē′tər]
n.
  1. A unit of length equal to one thousandth (10-3) of a meter (0.0394 inch).
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

millimetric in Science

millimeter

[mĭlə-mē′tər]
  1. A unit of length in the metric system equal to 0.001 meter. See Table at measurement.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.