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minstrel

[ min-struhl ]
/ ˈmɪn strəl /
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noun
a medieval poet and musician who sang or recited while accompanying himself on a stringed instrument, either as a member of a noble household or as an itinerant troubadour.
a musician, singer, or poet.
one of a troupe of comedians, usually white men in blackface, presenting songs, jokes, etc., and portraying negative racial stereotypes.
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Origin of minstrel

1175–1225; Middle English ministrel<Old French <Late Latin ministeriālis servant (noun use of adj.); see ministerial
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use minstrel in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for minstrel

minstrel
/ (ˈmɪnstrəl) /

noun
a medieval wandering musician who performed songs or recited poetry with instrumental accompaniment
a performer in a minstrel show
archaic, or poetic any poet, musician, or singer

Word Origin for minstrel

C13: from Old French menestral, from Late Latin ministeriālis an official, from Latin minister
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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