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troubadour

[ troo-buh-dawr, -dohr, -door ]
/ ˈtru bəˌdɔr, -ˌdoʊr, -ˌdʊər /
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noun

one of a class of medieval lyric poets who flourished principally in southern France from the 11th to 13th centuries, and wrote songs and poems of a complex metrical form in langue d'oc, chiefly on themes of courtly love.Compare trouvère.
any wandering singer or minstrel.

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Origin of troubadour

1720–30; <French <Provençal trobador, equivalent to trob(ar) to find, compose (see trover) + -ador<Latin -ātor-ator
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for troubadour

British Dictionary definitions for troubadour

troubadour
/ (ˈtruːbəˌdʊə) /

noun

any of a class of lyric poets who flourished principally in Provence and N Italy from the 11th to the 13th centuries, writing chiefly on courtly love in complex metric form
a singer

Word Origin for troubadour

C18: from French, from Old Provençal trobador, from trobar to write verses, perhaps ultimately from Latin tropus trope
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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