mole

1
[ mohl ]
/ moʊl /

noun

any of various small insectivorous mammals, especially of the family Talpidae, living chiefly underground, and having velvety fur, very small eyes, and strong forefeet: I stopped hating the moles in my rose garden when I realized they were eating the Japanese beetle grubs.
a spy who becomes part of and works from within the ranks of an enemy governmental staff or intelligence agency: There is always a risk that the mole may defect to the enemy.Compare double agent.
Machinery. a large, powerful machine for boring through earth or rock, used in the construction of tunnels: He worked as a mechanic on the mole that created our subway tunnels.

Origin of mole

1
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English molle; akin to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German mol

Definition for mole (2 of 6)

mole2
[ mohl ]
/ moʊl /

noun

a small, congenital spot or blemish on the human skin, usually of a dark color, slightly elevated, and sometimes hairy; nevus: The pamphlet explains why it's important to monitor changes in a mole's color or shape.

Origin of mole

2
First recorded before 1000; Middle English; Old English māl; akin to Old High German meil “spot,” Gothic mail “wrinkle”

Definition for mole (3 of 6)

mole3
[ mohl ]
/ moʊl /

noun

a massive structure, especially of stone, set up in the water, as for a breakwater, pier, or causeway: a mole may be topped with pierlike wooden planking, but unlike a typical pier, the mole does not allow water to pass under it: Islanders are raising money to restore the mole that once ran to the mainland.
an anchorage or harbor protected by such a structure: For our small fleet of boats, this mole has been most accommodating.

Origin of mole

3
First recorded in 1540–50; from Latin mōlēs “mass, dam, mole”

Definition for mole (4 of 6)

mole4

or mol

[ mohl ]
/ moʊl /

noun Chemistry.

the basic unit in the International System of Units (SI), representing the amount of a substance expressed in grams containing as many atoms, molecules, or ions as the number of atoms in 12 grams of carbon-12 (which is Avogadro's number, or 6.022 × 1023): To express the concentration of the substance in solution, use moles per liter.

Origin of mole

4
First recorded in 1900–05; from German Mol, short for Molekül, the German word for molecule

Definition for mole (5 of 6)

mole5
[ mohl ]
/ moʊl /

noun Pathology, Embryology.

Origin of mole

5
First recorded in1350–1400; Middle English mola, from Latin mola, “millstone, false conception”

Definition for mole (6 of 6)

mole6
[ moh-ley; Spanish maw-le ]
/ ˈmoʊ leɪ; Spanish ˈmɔ lɛ /

noun Mexican Cooking.

a spicy sauce typically flavored with dark chocolate, chile peppers, and spices, usually served with turkey or chicken: Have you tried making your mole in a slow cooker?

Origin of mole

6
First recorded in 1880–85; from Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl mōlli “sauce, gravy”; see guacamole
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for mole

British Dictionary definitions for mole (1 of 6)

mole1
/ (məʊl) /

noun

any small burrowing mammal, of the family Talpidae, of Europe, Asia, and North and Central America: order Insectivora (insectivores). They have velvety, typically dark fur and forearms specialized for digging
golden mole any small African burrowing molelike mammal of the family Chrysochloridae, having copper-coloured fur: order Insectivora (insectivores)
informal a spy who has infiltrated an organization and, often over a long period, become a trusted member of it

Word Origin for mole

C14: from Middle Dutch mol, of Germanic origin; compare Middle Low German mol

British Dictionary definitions for mole (2 of 6)

mole2
/ (məʊl) /

noun

a breakwater
a harbour protected by a breakwater
a large tunnel excavator for use in soft rock

Word Origin for mole

C16: from French môle, from Latin mōlēs mass

British Dictionary definitions for mole (3 of 6)

mole3
/ (məʊl) /

noun

pathol a nontechnical name for naevus

Word Origin for mole

Old English māl; related to Old High German meil spot

British Dictionary definitions for mole (4 of 6)

mole4
/ (məʊl) /

noun

the basic SI unit of amount of substance; the amount that contains as many elementary entities as there are atoms in 0.012 kilogram of carbon-12. The entity must be specified and may be an atom, a molecule, an ion, a radical, an electron, a photon, etcSymbol: mol

Word Origin for mole

C20: from German Mol, short for Molekül molecule

British Dictionary definitions for mole (5 of 6)

mole5
/ (məʊl) /

noun

pathol a fleshy growth in the uterus formed by the degeneration of fetal tissues

Word Origin for mole

C17: medical use of Latin mola millstone

British Dictionary definitions for mole (6 of 6)

mole6
/ (ˈməʊleɪ) /

noun

a spicy Mexican sauce made from chili and chocolate

Word Origin for mole

C20: from Mexican Spanish from Nahuatl molli sauce
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for mole (1 of 3)

mole 11
[ mōl ]

n.

A small congenital growth on the skin, usually slightly raised and dark and sometimes hairy, especially a pigmented nevus.nevus pigmentosus

Medical definitions for mole (2 of 3)

mole 22
[ mōl ]

n.

A fleshy abnormal mass formed in the uterus by the degeneration or abortive development of an ovum.
hydatidiform mole

Medical definitions for mole (3 of 3)

mole 33

n.

The amount of a substance that contains as many atoms, molecules, ions, or other elementary units as the number of atoms in 0.012 kilogram of carbon 12. The number is 6.0225 X 1023, or Avogadro's number.gram molecule
The mass in grams of this amount of a substance, numerically equal to the molecular weight of the substance.gram-molecular weight
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for mole (1 of 2)

mole1
[ mōl ]

A small, usually pigmented, benign growth on the skin.

Scientific definitions for mole (2 of 2)

mole2
[ mōl ]

The amount of an element, compound, or other substance that has the same number of basic particles as 12 grams of Carbon-12. The number of particles making up a mole is Avogadro's number. For elements and compounds, the mass of one mole, in grams, is roughly equal to the atomic or molecular weight of the substance. For example, carbon dioxide, CO2, has a molecular weight of 44; therefore, one mole of it weighs 44 grams.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.