moody

[ moo-dee ]
/ ˈmu di /

adjective, mood·i·er, mood·i·est.

given to gloomy, depressed, or sullen moods; ill-humored.
proceeding from or showing such a mood: a moody silence.
expressing or exhibiting sharply varying moods; temperamental.

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Origin of moody

before 900; Middle English mody,Old English mōdig.See mood1, -y1

OTHER WORDS FROM moody

mood·i·ly, adverbmood·i·ness, nounun·mood·y, adjective

Definition for moody (2 of 2)

Moody
[ moo-dee ]
/ ˈmu di /

noun

Dwight Ly·man [lahy-muhn], /ˈlaɪ mən/, 1837–99, U.S. evangelist.
Helen Wills. Wills, Helen Newington.
William Vaughn [vawn], /vɔn/, 1869–1910, U.S. poet and playwright.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for moody

British Dictionary definitions for moody (1 of 2)

moody
/ (ˈmuːdɪ) /

adjective moodier or moodiest

sullen, sulky, or gloomy
temperamental or changeable

Derived forms of moody

moodily, adverbmoodiness, noun

British Dictionary definitions for moody (2 of 2)

Moody
/ (ˈmuːdɪ) /

noun

Dwight Lyman. 1837–99, US evangelist and hymnodist, noted for his revivalist campaigns in Britain and the US with I. D. Sankey
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for moody

moody
[ mōōdē ]

adj.

Given to frequent changes of mood; temperamental.
Subject to periods of depression; sulky.
Expressive of a mood, especially a sullen or gloomy mood.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.