nasty

[ nas-tee ]
/ ˈnæs ti /
See synonyms for: nasty / nastiness on Thesaurus.com

adjective, nas·ti·er, nas·ti·est.

noun, plural nas·ties.

Informal. a nasty person or thing.

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Origin of nasty

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English, further origin unknown

OTHER WORDS FROM nasty

nas·ti·ly, adverbnas·ti·ness, noun

Definition for nasty (2 of 2)

-nasty

a combining form with the meaning “nastic pressure,” of the kind or in the direction specified by the initial element: hyponasty.

Origin of -nasty

<Greek nast(ós) pressed close (see nastic) + -y3
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for nasty

British Dictionary definitions for nasty (1 of 2)

nasty
/ (ˈnɑːstɪ) /

adjective -tier or -tiest

unpleasant, offensive, or repugnant
(of an experience, condition, etc) unpleasant, dangerous, or painfula nasty wound
spiteful, abusive, or ill-natured
obscene or indecent
nasty piece of work British informal a cruel or mean person

noun plural -ties

an offensive or unpleasant person or thinga video nasty

Derived forms of nasty

nastily, adverbnastiness, noun

Word Origin for nasty

C14: origin obscure; probably related to Swedish dialect nasket and Dutch nestig dirty

British Dictionary definitions for nasty (2 of 2)

-nasty

n combining form

indicating a nastic movement to a certain stimulusnyctinasty

Derived forms of -nasty

-nastic, adj combining form

Word Origin for -nasty

from Greek nastos pressed down, close-pressed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012