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neutralize

[ noo-truh-lahyz, nyoo- ]
/ ˈnu trəˌlaɪz, ˈnyu- /
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See synonyms for: neutralize / neutralized / neutralizing / neutralizer on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), neu·tral·ized, neu·tral·iz·ing.
verb (used without object), neu·tral·ized, neu·tral·iz·ing.
to become neutral or neutralized; undergo neutralization: With this additive the solution begins to neutralize.
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Also especially British, neu·tral·ise .

Origin of neutralize

First recorded in 1655–65; neutral + -ize

OTHER WORDS FROM neutralize

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use neutralize in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for neutralize

neutralize

neutralise

/ (ˈnjuːtrəˌlaɪz) /

verb (mainly tr)
(also intr) to render or become ineffective or neutral by counteracting, mixing, etc; nullify
(also intr) to make or become electrically or chemically neutral
to exclude (a country) from the sphere of warfare or alliances by international agreementthe great powers neutralized Belgium in the 19th century
to render (an army) incapable of further military action

Derived forms of neutralize

neutralization or neutralisation, nounneutralizer or neutraliser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for neutralize

neutralize
[ nōōtrə-līz′ ]

To cause an acidic solution to become neutral by adding a base to it or to cause a basic solution to become neutral by adding an acid to it. Salt and water are usually formed in the process.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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