noise

[ noiz ]
/ nɔɪz /

noun

verb (used with object), noised, nois·ing.

to spread, as a report or rumor; disseminate (usually followed by about or abroad): A new scandal is being noised about.

verb (used without object), noised, nois·ing.

to talk much or publicly.
to make a noise, outcry, or clamor.

Origin of noise

1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin nausea seasickness. See nausea

SYNONYMS FOR noise

1 clatter, blare, uproar, tumult. Noise, clamor, din, hubbub, racket refer to unmusical or confused sounds. Noise is the general word and is applied equally to soft or loud, confused or inharmonious sounds: street noises. Clamor and hubbub are alike in referring to loud noises resulting from shouting, cries, animated or excited tones, and the like; but in clamor the emphasis is on the meaning of the shouting, and in hubbub the emphasis is on the confused mingling of sounds: the clamor of an angry crowd; His voice could be heard above the hubbub. Din suggests a loud, resonant noise, painful if long continued: the din of a boiler works. Racket suggests a loud, confused noise of the kind produced by clatter or percussion: He always makes a racket when he cleans up the dishes.
2 See sound1.

OTHER WORDS FROM noise

un·noised, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for noising

British Dictionary definitions for noising

noise
/ (nɔɪz) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for noise

C13: from Old French, from Latin: nausea
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012