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clamor

1
[ klam-er ]
/ ˈklæm ər /
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noun

verb (used without object)

to make a clamor; raise an outcry.

verb (used with object)

to drive, force, influence, etc., by clamoring: The newspapers clamored him out of office.
to utter noisily:They clamored their demands at the meeting.

SYNONYMS FOR clamor

1 shouting.

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Also especially British, clam·our .

Origin of clamor

1
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English clamor (from Anglo-French ), from Latin, equivalent to clām- (see claim) + -or-or1; Middle English clamour, from Middle French, from Latin clāmōr- (stem of clāmor)

synonym study for clamor

4. See noise.

usage note for clamor

See -or.

OTHER WORDS FROM clamor

clam·or·er, clam·or·ist, noun

Definition for clamor (2 of 2)

clamor2
[ klam-er ]
/ ˈklæm ər /

verb (used with object) Obsolete.

to silence.

Origin of clamor

2
1605–15; perhaps spelling variant of clammer, obsolete variant of clamber in sense “to clutch,” hence “reduce to silence”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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