militant

[mil-i-tuhnt]
||

adjective

vigorously active and aggressive, especially in support of a cause: militant reformers.
engaged in warfare; fighting.

noun

a militant person.
a person engaged in warfare or combat.

Origin of militant

1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin mīlitant- (stem of mīlitāns), present participle of mīlitāre to serve as a soldier. See militate, -ant
Related formsmil·i·tan·cy, mil·i·tant·ness, nounmil·i·tant·ly, adverbhy·per·mil·i·tant, adjectivehy·per·mil·i·tant·ly, adverbnon·mil·i·tan·cy, nounnon·mil·i·tant, adjective, nounnon·mil·i·tant·ly, adverbsu·per·mil·i·tant, adjectiveul·tra·mil·i·tant, adjectiveun·mil·i·tant, adjectiveun·mil·i·tant·ly, adverb

Synonyms for militant

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Related Words for non-militant

private, noncombatant

Examples from the Web for non-militant

Historical Examples of non-militant


British Dictionary definitions for non-militant

militant

adjective

aggressive or vigorous, esp in the support of a causea militant protest
warring; engaged in warfare

noun

a militant person
Derived Formsmilitancy or rare militantness, nounmilitantly, adverb

Word Origin for militant

C15: from Latin mīlitāre to be a soldier, from mīles soldier

Militant

noun

a member of Militant Tendency
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for non-militant

militant

adj.

early 15c., "fighting, engaged in warfare," from Middle French militant "fighting," from Latin militantem (nominative militans), present participle of militare "serve as a soldier" (see militate), originally especially in Church militant. Related: Militantly.

militant

n.

"one engaged in war or strife," c.1600, from militant (adj.); in a political sense, it is attested by 1907.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper