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Occam

or Ock·ham

[ ok-uhm ]

noun

  1. William of, died 1349?, English scholastic philosopher.


Occam

/ ˈɒkəm /

noun

  1. See Ockham
    a variant spelling of (William of) Ockham


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Other Words From

  • Occam·ism noun
  • Occam·ist Occam·ite noun
  • Occam·istic adjective

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Example Sentences

Occam’s razor is a principle that urges you to consider the simplest explanations for a result before you start trying to prove a more arcane, tangly hypothesis.

It’s Occam’s Razor, preferring the simple, avoiding unnecessary complications.

Another argument involves evolution and applies Occam’s razor—the simplest explanation is usually the right one.

The cause of the Nominalists was almost desperate, till Occam in the fourteenth century revived the dying embers.

Melanchthon read the writings of William Occam, an old scholastic, with great zeal.

This empirical identification of meaning by means of the specific fact of suggestion cuts deep—if Occam's razor still cuts.

His work consists in the systematic development of the views of his master, William of Occam.

The school of St. Thomas engaged in it early against the theory of Occam, which was quite similar to that which we combat.

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occ.Occam's razor