of course


In the customary or expected order, naturally, as in The new minister did not, of course, fire the church secretary. This usage, first recorded in 1548, employs course in the sense of “ordinary procedure.”

Words Nearby of course

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

How to use of course in a sentence

  • Living in a sort of dreamtime characterizes experience now, as the Moon is void-of-course a few times this week.

    Your Horoscopes | Starsky + Cox | May 21, 2011 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • With the Moon squaring Jupiter then void-of-course, a financial opportunity may be riskier than it appears.

    Your Horoscopes | Starsky + Cox | May 21, 2011 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • Some void-of-course Moon maneuvers provide desired emotional detachment.

    Your Horoscopes | Starsky + Cox | May 21, 2011 | THE DAILY BEAST
  • The foolishness would not be so noticeable if the Brokenness were not so hideous and genuine and actual and matter-of-course.

    I, Mary MacLane | Mary MacLane
  • Even speak his decision for him, as though it were a matter-of-course.

    Certain Success | Norval A. Hawkins
  • At evening he went home with Mr. Hobart in the most matter-of-course way.

  • Not merely the politicians but the bulk of the people accepted this in a matter-of-course way as the only proper attitude.

    Theodore Roosevelt | Theodore Roosevelt
  • The people accepted and practiced in a matter-of-course way as quite proper things which they would not now tolerate.

    Theodore Roosevelt | Theodore Roosevelt