Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

osier

[oh-zher]
noun
  1. any of various willows, as the red osier, having tough, flexible twigs or branches that are used for wickerwork.
  2. a twig from such a willow.
  3. any of various North American dogwoods.
Show More

Origin of osier

1300–50; Middle English < Middle French; akin to Medieval Latin ausāria willow bed
Related formso·siered, adjectiveo·sier·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for osier

Historical Examples of osier

  • Still, she often neglected her osier tray to go rambling about the neighbourhood.

    The Fat and the Thin

    Emile Zola

  • Kalliope was never beaten by her grandfather with osier rods.

    The Island Mystery

    George A. Birmingham

  • Here it serves all the purposes to which the osier is applied in Europe.

  • An osier bow-net and two or three old fishing-boats might be seen there.

  • Usually made of osier, for the transport and measure of shingle-ballast.

    The Sailor's Word-Book

    William Henry Smyth


British Dictionary definitions for osier

osier

noun
  1. any of various willow trees, esp Salix viminalis, whose flexible branches or twigs are used for making baskets, etc
  2. a twig or branch from such a tree
  3. any of several North American dogwoods, esp the red osier
Show More

Word Origin for osier

C14: from Old French, probably from Medieval Latin ausēria, perhaps of Gaulish origin; compare Breton aoz
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for osier

n.

species of willow used in basket-work, c.1300, from Old French osier "willow twig" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin osera "willow," ausaria "willow bed," of unknown origin, perhaps from Gaulish. Old English had the word as oser, from Medieval Latin.

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper