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parvovirus

[pahr-voh-vahy-ruh s]
noun, plural par·vo·vi·rus·es.
  1. Veterinary Pathology. a highly contagious, often fatal viral disease of dogs, characterized by vomiting, severe diarrhea, and depression and accompanied by high fever and loss of appetite.
  2. any of several small DNA-containing viruses belonging to the genus Parvovirus, of the family Parvoviridae, especially the virus that causes the disease parvovirus in dogs or distemper in cats.
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Origin of parvovirus

1960–65; < Latin parv(us) small + -o- + virus
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

British Dictionary definitions for parvovirus

parvovirus

noun
  1. any of a group of viruses characterized by their very small size, each of which is specific to a particular species, as for example canine parvovirus
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Word Origin

C20: New Latin from Latin parvus little + virus
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for parvovirus

n.

1965, from parvi- + connecting element -o- + virus.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

parvovirus in Medicine

parvovirus

(pärvō-vī′rəs)
n.
  1. Any of a group of small viruses of the genus Parvovirus that cause disease in many vertebrates, especially mammals such as dogs and cattle.
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The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

parvovirus in Science

parvovirus

[pärvō-vī′rəs]
  1. Any of a group of small DNA viruses of the family Parvoviridae that cause disease in many vertebrates, especially a febrile infection in dogs resulting in vomiting, diarrhea, and sometimes death. In humans it commonly causes an acute contagious infection called fifth disease, marked by a facial rash.
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The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.