pavement

[ peyv-muh nt ]
/ ˈpeɪv mənt /

noun

a paved road, highway, etc.
a paved surface, ground covering, or floor.
a material used for paving.
Atlantic States and British. sidewalk.

Idioms

    pound the pavement, Informal. to walk the streets in order to accomplish something: If you're going to find work you'd better start pounding the pavement.

Origin of pavement

1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin pavīmentum. See pave, -ment
Related formspave·men·tal [peyv-men-tl] /peɪvˈmɛn tl/, adjectivepre·pave·ment, nounsub·pave·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for pavement

British Dictionary definitions for pavement

pavement

/ (ˈpeɪvmənt) /

noun

a hard-surfaced path for pedestrians alongside and a little higher than a roadUS and Canadian word: sidewalk
a paved surface, esp one that is a thoroughfare
the material used in paving
civil engineering the hard layered structure that forms a road carriageway, airfield runway, vehicle park, or other paved areas
geology a level area of exposed rock resembling a paved roadSee limestone pavement

Word Origin for pavement

C13: from Latin pavīmentum a hard floor, from pavīre to beat hard
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pavement

pavement


n.

mid-13c., from Old French pavement "roadway, pathway; paving stone" (12c.) and directly from Latin pavimentum "hard floor, level surface beaten firm," from pavire (see pave).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with pavement

pavement


see pound the pavement.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.