pilum

[pahy-luh m]
noun, plural pi·la [pahy-luh] /ˈpaɪ lə/.
  1. a javelin used in ancient Rome by legionaries, consisting of a three-foot-long shaft with an iron head of the same length.

Origin of pilum

From the Latin word pīlum dart, javelin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for pilum

Historical Examples of pilum

  • The day of the sword and pilum had given place to that of the lance and bow.

  • I am a spearman, but I prefer the North spear and the pilum.

    Ulric the Jarl

    William O. Stoddard

  • Then picked he up a pilum from the hand of a slain legionary and he cast it with his might.

    Ulric the Jarl

    William O. Stoddard

  • I have heard that he casteth the pilum even better than do other Romans.

    Ulric the Jarl

    William O. Stoddard

  • Piliferous, bearing a slender bristle or hair (pilum), or beset with hairs.