po

[ poh ]
/ poʊ /
|

noun, plural pos. Australia and New Zealand.

a chamber pot.

Nearby words

  1. pnlg,
  2. pnp,
  3. pnpb,
  4. pnxt.,
  5. pnyx,
  6. po chü-i,
  7. po hai,
  8. po'ed,
  9. po-face,
  10. po-faced

Origin of po

1875–80; probably < French pot (de chambre) chamber pot

Po

[ poh ]
/ poʊ /

noun

a river in Italy, flowing E from the Alps in the NW to the Adriatic. 418 miles (669 km) long.
Ancient Padus.

Po

Symbol, Chemistry.

po.

Baseball.

put-out; put-outs.

p.o.

(in prescriptions) by mouth.

Origin of p.o.

From the Latin word per ōs

P.O.

parole officer.
petty officer.
postal (money) order.
post office.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for po


British Dictionary definitions for po

po

/ (pəʊ) /

noun plural pos

British an informal word for chamber pot

Word Origin for po

C19: from pot 1

Po

1

the chemical symbol for

polonium

Po

2
/ (pəʊ) /

noun

a river in N Italy, rising in the Cottian Alps and flowing northeast to Turin, then east to the Adriatic: the longest river in Italy. Length: 652 km (405 miles)Latin name: Padus

PO

abbreviation for

Post Office
Personnel Officer
petty officer
Pilot Officer
Also: p.o. postal order
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for po

Po

large river in northern Italy, from Latin Padus, a name of Celtic origin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for po

Po

The symbol for the elementpolonium

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for po

Po

The symbol for polonium.

polonium

[ pə-lōnē-əm ]

Po

A very rare, naturally radioactive, silvery-gray or black metalloid element. It is produced in extremely small amounts by the radioactive decay of radium or the bombardment of bismuth or lead with neutrons. Atomic number 84; melting point 254°C; boiling point 962°C; specific gravity 9.20; valence 2, 4. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.