podium

[ poh-dee-uhm ]
/ ˈpoʊ di əm /

noun, plural po·di·ums, po·di·a [poh-dee-uh]. /ˈpoʊ di ə/.

verb (used without object)

(in a sports competition) to finish first, second, or third and receive an award while standing on a podium: He’s podiumed in five of his past six races.

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Origin of podium

1605–15; <Latin: “elevated place, balcony” <Greek pódion “little foot,” equivalent to pod- pod- + -ion diminutive suffix. See pew

Definition for podium (2 of 2)

-podium

a combining form meaning “footlike part” of an organism, used in the formation of compound words: monopodium; pseudo-podium.
Also -pode.

Origin of -podium

From New Latin; see origin at podium
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for podium

  • The temples were built on lofty platforms (podia), to give them a more commanding appearance.

    Rambles in Rome|S. Russell Forbes

British Dictionary definitions for podium (1 of 2)

podium
/ (ˈpəʊdɪəm) /

noun plural -diums or -dia (-dɪə)

a small raised platform used by lecturers, orchestra conductors, etc; dais
a plinth that supports a colonnade or wall
a low wall surrounding the arena of an ancient amphitheatre
zoology
  1. the terminal part of a vertebrate limb
  2. any footlike organ, such as the tube foot of a starfish

Word Origin for podium

C18: from Latin: platform, balcony, from Greek podion little foot, from pous foot

British Dictionary definitions for podium (2 of 2)

-podium

n combining form

a part resembling a footpseudopodium

Word Origin for -podium

from New Latin: footlike; see podium
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012