Podunk

[poh-duhngk]
noun
  1. any small and insignificant or inaccessible town or village: After a year in the big city, I was ready to move back to Podunk.

Origin of Podunk

1660–70, Americanism; generic use of Podunk, village near Hartford, Conn.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for podunk

Contemporary Examples of podunk

Historical Examples of podunk


Word Origin and History for podunk

Podunk

legendary small town, 1846, originally the name of a small group of Indians who lived around the Podunk River in Connecticut; the tribe name is in colonial records from 1656 (as Potunck), from southern New England Algonquian (Mohegan or Massachusetts) Potunk, probably from pautaunke, from pot- "to sink" + locative suffix -unk, thus "a boggy place." Its popularity as the name of a typical (if mythical) U.S. small town dates from a series of witty "Letters from Podunk" which ran in the "Buffalo Daily National Pilot" newspaper beginning Jan. 5, 1846.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper