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pole

1
[ pohl ]
/ poʊl /
Save This Word!

noun
verb (used with object), poled, pol·ing.
verb (used without object), poled, pol·ing.
to propel a boat, raft, etc., with a pole: to pole down the river.
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Idioms about pole

    under bare poles,
    1. Nautical. (of a sailing ship) with no sails set, as during a violent storm.
    2. stripped; naked; destitute: The thugs robbed him and left him under bare poles.

Origin of pole

1
First recorded before 1050; Middle English pol(e), polle, Old English pāl, from Latin pālus “wooden post, stake”; see pale2

OTHER WORDS FROM pole

poleless, adjectiveun·poled, adjective

Other definitions for pole (2 of 4)

pole2
[ pohl ]
/ poʊl /

noun

Origin of pole

2
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English pol(e), polus, from Latin polus, from Greek pólos “pivot, axis, pole”

Other definitions for pole (3 of 4)

Pole1
[ pohl ]
/ poʊl /

noun
a native or inhabitant of Poland.

Other definitions for pole (4 of 4)

Pole2
[ pohl ]
/ poʊl /

noun
Reginald, 1500–58, English cardinal and last Roman Catholic archbishop of Canterbury.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use pole in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for pole (1 of 4)

pole1
/ (pəʊl) /

noun
verb

Word Origin for pole

Old English pāl, from Latin pālus a stake, prop; see pale ²

British Dictionary definitions for pole (2 of 4)

pole2
/ (pəʊl) /

noun

Word Origin for pole

C14: from Latin polus end of an axis, from Greek polos pivot, axis, pole; related to Greek kuklos circle

British Dictionary definitions for pole (3 of 4)

Pole1
/ (pəʊl) /

noun
a native, inhabitant, or citizen of Poland or a speaker of Polish

British Dictionary definitions for pole (4 of 4)

Pole2
/ (pəʊl) /

noun
Reginald. 1500–58, English cardinal; last Roman Catholic archbishop of Canterbury (1556–58)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for pole

pole
[ pōl ]

n.
Either of the two points at the extremities of the axis of an organ or body.
Either extremity of an axis through a sphere.
Either of two oppositely charged terminals, as in an electric cell.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for pole

pole
[ pōl ]

Mathematics
  1. Either of the points at which an axis that passes through the center of a sphere intersects the surface of the sphere.
  2. The fixed point used as a reference in a system of polar coordinates. It corresponds to the origin in the Cartesian coordinate system.
  1. Geography Either of the points at which the Earth's axis of rotation intersects the Earth's surface; the North Pole or South Pole.
  2. Either of the two similar points on another planet.
Physics A magnetic pole.
Electricity Either of two oppositely charged terminals, such as the two electrodes of an electrolytic cell or the electric terminals of a battery.
Biology
  1. Either of the two points at the extremities of the axis of an organ or body.
  2. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Other Idioms and Phrases with pole

pole

see low man on the totem pole; not touch with a ten-foot pole.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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