pram

1
[ pram ]
/ præm /

noun Chiefly British Informal.

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Origin of pram

1
First recorded in 1880–85; by shortening

Definition for pram (2 of 2)

pram2
[ prahm ]
/ prɑm /

noun

a flat-bottomed, snub-nosed boat used as a fishing vessel or tender for larger vessels.

Origin of pram

2
1540–50 (late 14th century in AL); < Dutch praam, Middle Dutch prame, praem (compare Middle Low German pram(e), Old Frisian pram, German Prahm) < Slavic; compare Czech prám, Polish prom, Russian paróm, Serbo-Croatian prȁm ferryboat, raft, cognate with Old High German farm boat, raft, Old Norse farmr freight, cargo; akin to fare, ferry
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for pram

British Dictionary definitions for pram (1 of 2)

pram1
/ (præm) /

noun

British a cot-like four-wheeled carriage for a babyUS and Canadian term: baby carriage

Word Origin for pram

C19: shortened and altered from perambulator

British Dictionary definitions for pram (2 of 2)

pram2
/ (prɑːm) /

noun

nautical a light tender with a flat bottom and a bow formed from the ends of the side and bottom planks meeting in a small raised transom

Word Origin for pram

C16: from Middle Dutch prame; related to Old Frisian prām
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012