precisionism

[ pri-sizh-uh-niz-uh m ]
/ prɪˈsɪʒ əˌnɪz əm /

noun

(sometimes initial capital letter) a style of painting developed to its fullest in the U.S. in the 1920s, associated especially with Charles Demuth, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Charles Sheeler, and characterized by clinically precise, simple, and clean-edged rendering of architectural, industrial, or urban scenes usually devoid of human activity or presence.

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Origin of precisionism

First recorded in 1955–60; precision + -ism

OTHER WORDS FROM precisionism

pre·ci·sion·ist, noun, adjectivepre·ci·sion·is·tic, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020