predict

[ pri-dikt ]
/ prɪˈdɪkt /

verb (used with object)

to declare or tell in advance; prophesy; foretell: to predict the weather; to predict the fall of a civilization.

verb (used without object)

to foretell the future; make a prediction.

Origin of predict

1540–50; < Latin praedictus, past participle of praedīcere to foretell, equivalent to prae- pre- + dic-, variant stem of dīcere to say + -tus past participle suffix; see dictum
SYNONYMS FOR predict
1, 2 presage, divine, augur, project, prognosticate, portend. Predict, prophesy, foresee, forecast mean to know or tell (usually correctly) beforehand what will happen. To predict is usually to foretell with precision of calculation, knowledge, or shrewd inference from facts or experience: The astronomers can predict an eclipse; it may, however, be used without the implication of underlying knowledge or expertise: I predict she'll be a success at the party. Prophesy usually means to predict future events by the aid of divine or supernatural inspiration: Merlin prophesied the two knights would meet in conflict; this verb, too, may be used in a more general, less specific sense. I prophesy he'll be back in the old job. To foresee refers specifically not to the uttering of predictions but to the mental act of seeing ahead; there is often (but not always) a practical implication of preparing for what will happen: He was clever enough to foresee this shortage of materials. Forecast has much the same meaning as predict; it is used today particularly of the weather and other phenomena that cannot easily be accurately predicted: Rain and snow are forecast for tonight. Economists forecast a rise in family income.
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for predicting

British Dictionary definitions for predicting

predict

/ (prɪˈdɪkt) /

verb

(tr; may take a clause as object) to state or make a declaration about in advance, esp on a reasoned basis; foretell
Derived Formspredictable, adjectivepredictability or predictableness, nounpredictably, adverb

Word Origin for predict

C17: from Latin praedīcere to mention beforehand, from prae before + dīcere to say
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for predicting

predict


v.

1620s (implied in predicted), "foretell, prophesy," a back formation from prediction or else from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicere "foretell, advise, give notice," from prae "before" (see pre-) + dicere "to say" (see diction). Related: Predicted; predicting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper