reckoning

[ rek-uh-ning ]
/ ˈrɛk ə nɪŋ /

noun

Origin of reckoning

Middle English word dating back to 1250–1300; see origin at reckon, -ing1

Related forms

pre·reck·on·ing, nounself-reck·on·ing, adjective, noun

Definition for reckoning (2 of 2)

reckon

[ rek-uhn ]
/ ˈrɛk ən /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

Verb Phrases

reckon with,
  1. to include in consideration or planning; anticipate: He hadn't reckoned with so many obstacles.
  2. to deal with: I have to reckon with many problems every day.

Origin of reckon

before 1000; Middle English rekenen, Old English gerecenian (attested once) to report, pay; cognate with German rechnen to compute

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for reckoning

British Dictionary definitions for reckoning (1 of 2)

reckoning

/ (ˈrɛkənɪŋ) /

noun

the act of counting or calculating
settlement of an account or bill
a bill or account
retribution for one's actions (esp in the phrase day of reckoning)
nautical short for dead reckoning

British Dictionary definitions for reckoning (2 of 2)

reckon

/ (ˈrɛkən) /

verb

Word Origin for reckon

Old English (ge) recenian recount; related to Old Frisian rekenia, Old High German rehhanón to count
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with reckoning

reckon


In addition to the idiom beginning with reckon

  • reckon with

also see:

  • force to be reckoned with
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.