predispose

[ pree-di-spohz ]
/ ˌpri dɪˈspoʊz /

verb (used with object), pre·dis·posed, pre·dis·pos·ing.

to give an inclination or tendency to beforehand; make susceptible: Genetic factors may predispose human beings to certain metabolic diseases.
to render subject, susceptible, or liable: The evidence predisposes him to public censure.
to dispose beforehand.
Archaic. to dispose of beforehand, as in a will, legacy, or the like.

verb (used without object), pre·dis·posed, pre·dis·pos·ing.

to give or furnish a tendency or inclination: an underground job that predisposes to lung infection.

Origin of predispose

First recorded in 1640–50; pre- + dispose
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for predisposed

British Dictionary definitions for predisposed

predispose

/ (ˌpriːdɪˈspəʊz) /

verb (tr)

(often foll by to or towards) to incline or make (someone) susceptible to something beforehand
mainly law to dispose of (property, etc) beforehand; bequeath
Derived Formspredisposal, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for predisposed

predispose


v.

1640s, "to put into a certain frame of mind," perhaps a back-formation from predisposition. Related: Predisposed; predisposing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for predisposed

predispose

[ prē′dĭ-spōz ]

v.

To make susceptible, as to a disease.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.