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prodigal

[ prod-i-guhl ]
/ ˈprɒd ɪ gəl /
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adjective
wastefully or recklessly extravagant: prodigal expenditure.
giving or yielding profusely; very generous; lavish (usually followed by of or with): prodigal of smiles; prodigal with praise.
lavishly abundant; profuse: nature's prodigal resources.
noun
a person who is wasteful of his or her money, possessions, etc.; spendthrift: In later years, he was a prodigal of his fortune.
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Origin of prodigal

First recorded in 1500–10; back formation from prodigality

synonym study for prodigal

1. See lavish.

OTHER WORDS FROM prodigal

prod·i·gal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use prodigal in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for prodigal

prodigal
/ (ˈprɒdɪɡəl) /

adjective
recklessly wasteful or extravagant, as in disposing of goods or money
lavish in giving or yieldingprodigal of compliments
noun
a person who spends lavishly or squanders money

Derived forms of prodigal

prodigality, nounprodigally, adverb

Word Origin for prodigal

C16: from Medieval Latin prōdigālis wasteful, from Latin prōdigus lavish, from prōdigere to squander, from pro- 1 + agere to drive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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