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promulgate

[ prom-uhl-geyt ]
/ ˈprɒm əlˌgeɪt /
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See synonyms for: promulgate / promulgated on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), prom·ul·gat·ed, prom·ul·gat·ing.
to make known by open declaration; publish; proclaim formally or put into operation (a law, decree of a court, etc.).
to set forth or teach publicly (a creed, doctrine, etc.).
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Origin of promulgate

First recorded in 1520–30; from Latin prōmulgātus, past participle of prōmulgāre “to make known, promulgate”; see promulge, -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM promulgate

prom·ul·ga·tion [prom-uhl-gey-shuhn], /ˌprɒm əlˈgeɪ ʃən/, nounprom·ul·ga·tor, nounre·prom·ul·gate, verb (used with object), re·prom·ul·gat·ed, re·prom·ul·gat·ing.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use promulgate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for promulgate

promulgate
/ (ˈprɒməlˌɡeɪt) /

verb (tr)
to put into effect (a law, decree, etc), esp by formal proclamation
to announce or declare officially
to make widespread
Also (archaic): promulge (prəʊˈmʌldʒ)

Derived forms of promulgate

promulgation, nounpromulgator, noun

Word Origin for promulgate

C16: from Latin prōmulgāre to bring to public knowledge; probably related to provulgāre to publicize, from pro- 1 + vulgāre to make common, from vulgus the common people
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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