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quantitative

[kwon-ti-tey-tiv]
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adjective
  1. that is or may be estimated by quantity.
  2. of or relating to the describing or measuring of quantity.
  3. of or relating to a metrical system, as that of classical verse, based on the alternation of long and short, rather than accented and unaccented, syllables.
  4. of or relating to the length of a spoken vowel or consonant.
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Sometimes quan·ti·tive [kwon-ti-tiv] /ˈkwɒn tɪ tɪv/.

Origin of quantitative

1575–85; < Medieval Latin quantitātīvus, equivalent to Latin quantitāt- (stem of quantitās) quantity + -īvus -ive
Related formsquan·ti·ta·tive·ly, quan·ti·tive·ly, adverbquan·ti·ta·tive·ness, quan·ti·tive·ness, nounnon·quan·ti·ta·tive, adjectivenon·quan·ti·ta·tive·ly, adverbnon·quan·ti·ta·tive·ness, nounun·quan·ti·ta·tive, adjective
Can be confusedqualitative quantitative
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for quantitive

quantitative

quantitive

adjective
  1. involving or relating to considerations of amount or sizeCompare qualitative
  2. capable of being measured
  3. prosody denoting or relating to a metrical system, such as that in Latin and Greek verse, that is based on the relative length rather than stress of syllables
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Derived Formsquantitatively or quantitively, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for quantitive

adj.

1650s, from quantity + -ive. Related: Quantitively.

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quantitative

adj.

1580s, "having quantity," from Medieval Latin quantitativus, from stem of Latin quantitas (see quantity). Meaning "measurable" is from 1650s. Related: Quantitatively.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper