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rabato

or re·ba·to

[ ruh-bah-toh, -bey- ]
/ rəˈbɑ toʊ, -ˈbeɪ- /
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noun, plural ra·ba·tos.

a wide, stiff collar of the 17th century, worn flat over the shoulders or open in front and standing at the back.
a stiff frame of wire or wood worn in the 17th century as a support for a ruff or stand-up collar.

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Origin of rabato

1585–95; <French (obsolete) rabateau;cf. rabat1

Words nearby rabato

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for rabato

rabato

rebato

/ (rəˈbɑːtəʊ) /

noun plural -tos

a wired or starched collar, often of intricate lace, that stood up at the back and sides: worn in the 17th century

Word Origin for rabato

C16: from French rabat collar, with the ending -o added as if the word were from Italian
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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