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rag

1
[ rag ]
/ ræg /
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See synonyms for: rag / ragged / ragging / rags on Thesaurus.com

noun
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Idioms about rag

    chew the rag. chew (def. 11).
    from rags to riches, from extreme poverty to great wealth: He went from rags to riches in only three years.

Origin of rag

1
First recorded in 1275–1325; Middle English ragge, from Scandinavian; compare Norwegian, Swedish ragg “coarse hair,” from Old Norse rǫgg

Other definitions for rag (2 of 4)

rag2
[ rag ]
/ ræg /
Informal.

verb (used without object) ragged, rag·ging.
to subject a person to teasing or scolding, especially in an intense or prolonged way (usually followed by on): Some of the boys were ragging on him about his haircut.
to criticize a person or thing (usually followed by on): He rags and whines to me instead of fixing the problem.I wish reviewers would stop ragging on the movie.
verb (used with object), ragged, rag·ging.
to subject to teasing or scolding, especially in an intense or prolonged way: He was ragged at school for not joining a sports team.
British. to torment with jokes; play crude practical jokes on.
noun
British. an act of ragging; a cruel or crude practical joke.

Origin of rag

2
First recorded in 1735–40; origin uncertain

Other definitions for rag (3 of 4)

rag3
[ rag ]
/ ræg /

verb (used with object), ragged, rag·ging.
to break up (lumps of ore) for sorting.

Origin of rag

3
First recorded in 1870–75; origin uncertain

Other definitions for rag (4 of 4)

rag4
[ rag ]
/ ræg /

noun
a musical composition in ragtime: a piano rag.
verb (used with object), ragged, rag·ging.
to play (music) in ragtime.

Origin of rag

4
First recorded in 1895–1900; shortened form of ragtime
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use rag in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for rag (1 of 4)

rag1
/ (ræɡ) /

noun
See also rags

Word Origin for rag

C14: probably back formation from ragged, from Old English raggig; related to Old Norse rögg tuft

British Dictionary definitions for rag (2 of 4)

rag2
/ (ræɡ) /

verb rags, ragging or ragged (tr)
to draw attention facetiously and persistently to the shortcomings or alleged shortcomings of (a person)
British to play rough practical jokes on
noun
British a boisterous practical joke, esp one on a fellow student
(in British universities)
  1. a period, usually a week, in which various events are organized to raise money for charity, including a procession of decorated floats and tableaux
  2. (as modifier)rag day

Word Origin for rag

C18: of uncertain origin

British Dictionary definitions for rag (3 of 4)

rag3
/ (ræɡ) jazz /

noun
a piece of ragtime music
verb rags, ragging or ragged
(tr) to compose or perform in ragtime

Word Origin for rag

C20: shortened from ragtime

British Dictionary definitions for rag (4 of 4)

rag4
/ (ræɡ) /

noun
a roofing slate that is rough on one side

Word Origin for rag

C13: of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with rag

rag

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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