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ream

1
[ reem ]
/ rim /
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See synonyms for: ream / reamed / reaming on Thesaurus.com

noun

a standard quantity of paper, consisting of 20 quires or 500 sheets (formerly 480 sheets), or 516 sheets (printer's ream, or perfect ream ).
Usually reams. a large quantity: He has written reams of poetry.

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Origin of ream

1
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English rem(e), from Middle French reime, rame, from Spanish rezma, from Arabic rizmah “bale”

Definition for ream (2 of 2)

ream2
[ reem ]
/ rim /

verb (used with object)

to enlarge to desired size (a previously bored hole) by means of a reamer.
to clear with a reamer; remove or press out by reaming.
to extract the juice from: to ream an orange.
Slang.
  1. to scold or reprimand severely (usually followed by out).
  2. to cheat; defraud.

Origin of ream

2
First recorded in 1805–15; origin uncertain
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for ream

British Dictionary definitions for ream (1 of 2)

ream1
/ (riːm) /

noun

a number of sheets of paper, formerly 480 sheets (short ream), now 500 sheets (long ream) or 516 sheets (printer's ream or perfect ream). One ream is equal to 20 quires
(often plural) informal a large quantity, esp of written matterhe wrote reams

Word Origin for ream

C14: from Old French raime, from Spanish rezma, from Arabic rizmah bale

British Dictionary definitions for ream (2 of 2)

ream2
/ (riːm) /

verb (tr)

to enlarge (a hole) by use of a reamer
US to extract (juice) from (a citrus fruit) using a reamer

Word Origin for ream

C19: perhaps from C14 remen to open up, from Old English rӯman to widen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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