appraise

[ uh-preyz ]
/ əˈpreɪz /

verb (used with object), ap·praised, ap·prais·ing.

to estimate the monetary value of; determine the worth of; assess: We had an expert appraise the house before we bought it.
to estimate the nature, quality, importance, etc.: He tried to appraise the poetry of John Updike.

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Origin of appraise

1400–50; late Middle English apraysen to set a value on, probably a conflation of aprisen to apprize1 and preisen to praise (with sense of prize2)

OTHER WORDS FROM appraise

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH appraise

appraise apprise
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for reappraise

British Dictionary definitions for reappraise (1 of 2)

reappraise
/ (ˌriːəˈpreɪz) /

verb (tr)

to assess the worth, value, or quality of (someone or something) again

British Dictionary definitions for reappraise (2 of 2)

appraise
/ (əˈpreɪz) /

verb (tr)

to assess the worth, value, or quality of
to make a valuation of, as for taxation purposes

Derived forms of appraise

Word Origin for appraise

C15: from Old French aprisier, from prisier to prize ²

usage for appraise

Appraise is sometimes wrongly used where apprise is meant: they had been apprised (not appraised) of my arrival
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012