invoke

[ in-vohk ]
/ ɪnˈvoʊk /

verb (used with object), in·voked, in·vok·ing.

QUIZZES

CAN YOU ACE THIS QUIZ ABOUT “COMPLIMENT” VS. “COMPLEMENT”?

Take this quiz to see if you really know the difference between “compliment” and “complement"!
Question 1 of 11
“Compliment” and “complement” had a shared meaning a long time ago, but today they are no longer interchangeable.

Origin of invoke

1480–90; < Latin invocāre, equivalent to in- in-2 + vocāre to call, akin to vōx voice

OTHER WORDS FROM invoke

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for reinvoke

  • The chrysanthemums and the roses and the hardy zenias that came up uncared for were powerless to reinvoke the spirit of the place.

British Dictionary definitions for reinvoke

invoke
/ (ɪnˈvəʊk) /

verb (tr)

to call upon (an agent, esp God or another deity) for help, inspiration, etc
to put (a law, penalty, etc) into usethe union invoked the dispute procedure
to appeal to (an outside agent or authority) for confirmation, corroboration, etc
to implore or beg (help, etc)
to summon (a spirit, demon, etc); conjure up

Derived forms of invoke

invocable, adjectiveinvoker, noun

Word Origin for invoke

C15: from Latin invocāre to call upon, appeal to, from vocāre to call

usage for invoke

Invoke is sometimes wrongly used where evoke is meant: this proposal evoked (not invoked) a strong reaction
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012