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release

[ ri-lees ]
/ rɪˈlis /
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See synonyms for: release / re-leased / re-leases / re-leasing on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), re·leased, re·leas·ing.

noun

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Origin of release

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English verb reles(s)en, relecen, from Old French relesser, relaissier, releiss(i)er, from Latin relaxāre “to loosen, stretch out”; Middle English noun reles(s)e, releise, from Old French reles, relais, releis, back formation from relesser, relaisser, releiss(i)er; see origin at lax, relax

synonym study for release

1. Release, free, dismiss, discharge, liberate, emancipate may all mean to set at liberty, let loose, or let go. Release and free, when applied to persons, suggest a helpful action. Both may be used (not always interchangeably) of delivering a person from confinement or obligation: to free or release prisoners. Free (less often, release ) is also used for delivering a person from pain, sorrow, etc.: to free from fear. Dismiss, meaning to send away, usually has the meaning of forcing to go unwillingly ( to dismiss a servant ), but may refer to giving permission to go: The teacher dismissed the class early. Discharge, meaning originally to relieve of a burden ( to discharge a gun ), has come to refer to that which is sent away, and is often a close synonym to dismiss; it is used in the meaning permit to go in connection with courts and the armed forces: The court discharged a man accused of robbery. Liberate and emancipate, more formal synonyms for release and free, also suggest action intended to be helpful. Liberate suggests particularly the release from unjust punishment, oppression, and the like, and often means to set free through forcible action or military campaign: They liberated the prisoners, the occupied territories, etc. Emancipate also suggests a release of some size and consequence, but one that is less overt, a more formal or legal freedom; and it sometimes connotes an inner liberation: Lincoln emancipated enslaved African Americans. John emancipated himself.

OTHER WORDS FROM release

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH release

re-lease, release

Definition for release (2 of 2)

re-lease
[ ree-lees ]
/ riˈlis /

verb (used with object), re-leased, re-leas·ing.

to lease again.
Law. to make over (land, property, etc.), as to another.

noun

a contract for re-leasing land or property.
the land or property re-leased.

Origin of re-lease

First recorded in 1820–30; re- + lease1

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH re-lease

re-lease , release
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for release

British Dictionary definitions for release

release
/ (rɪˈliːs) /

verb (tr)

noun

Derived forms of release

releaser, noun

Word Origin for release

C13: from Old French relesser, from Latin relaxāre to slacken; see relax
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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