re-pose

[ree-pohz]
|

verb (used with or without object), re-posed, re-pos·ing.

to pose again.

Origin of re-pose

Can be confusedre-pose repose

repose

1
[ri-pohz]

noun

the state of reposing or being at rest; rest; sleep.
peace; tranquillity; calm.
dignified calmness, as of manner; composure.
absence of movement, animation, etc.: When in repose, her face recalls the Mona Lisa.

verb (used without object), re·posed, re·pos·ing.

to lie or be at rest, as from work, activity, etc.
to lie dead: His body will repose in the chapel for two days.
to be peacefully calm and quiet: The sea reposed under the tropical sun.
to lie or rest on something.
Archaic. to depend or rely on a person or thing.

verb (used with object), re·posed, re·pos·ing.

to lay to rest; rest; refresh by rest (often used reflexively).

Origin of repose

1
1425–75; late Middle English reposen (v.) < Middle French reposer, Old French < Late Latin repausāre, equivalent to Latin re- re- + Late Latin pausāre to rest (derivative of Latin pausa pause)
Related formsre·pos·ed·ly [ri-poh-zid-lee] /rɪˈpoʊ zɪd li/, adverbre·pos·ed·ness, nounre·pos·er, noun
Can be confusedre-pose repose

repose

2
[ri-pohz]

verb (used with object), re·posed, re·pos·ing.

to put (confidence, trust, etc.) in a person or thing.
to put under the authority or at the disposal of a person.
Archaic. to deposit.

Origin of repose

2
1375–1425; late Middle English reposen to replace, representing Latin repōnere to put back; see re-, pose1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for reposes

Historical Examples of reposes


British Dictionary definitions for reposes

repose

1

noun

a state of quiet restfulness; peace or tranquillity
dignified calmness of manner; composure

verb

to place (oneself or one's body) in a state of quiet relaxation; lie or lay down at rest
(intr) to lie when dead, as in the grave
(intr ; foll by on, in, etc) formal to take support (from) or be based (on)your plan reposes on a fallacy
Derived Formsreposal, nounreposer, nounreposeful, adjectivereposefully, adverbreposefulness, noun

Word Origin for repose

C15: from Old French reposer, from Late Latin repausāre from re- + pausāre to stop; see pause

repose

2

verb (tr)

to put (trust or confidence) in a person or thing
to place or put (an object) somewhere
Derived Formsreposal, noun

Word Origin for repose

C15: from Latin repōnere to store up, from re- + pōnere to put
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for reposes

repose

v.1

"lie at rest," mid-15c., from Middle French reposer, from Old French repauser (10c.), from Late Latin repausare "cause to rest," from Latin re-, here probably an intensive prefix (see re-), + Late Latin pausare "to stop" (see pause (v.)). Related: Reposed; reposing.

repose

v.2

"put, place," mid-15c., from Latin repos-, stem of reponere "put back, set back, replace, restore; put away, lay out, stretch out," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). Or perhaps [Klein] formed in Middle English from Old French poser, on model of disposen "dispose."

repose

n.

"rest," c.1500, from Middle French repos (11c.), back-formation from reposer (see repose (v.1)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper