retain

[ ri-teyn ]
/ rɪˈteɪn /

verb (used with object)

to keep possession of.
to continue to use, practice, etc.: to retain an old custom.
to continue to hold or have: to retain a prisoner in custody; a cloth that retains its color.
to keep in mind; remember.
to hold in place or position.
to engage, especially by payment of a preliminary fee: to retain a lawyer.

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Origin of retain

1350–1400; Middle English reteinen < Old French retenir < Latin retinēre to hold back, hold fast, equivalent to re- re- + -tinēre, combining form of tenēre to hold

SYNONYMS FOR retain

1 hold, preserve. See keep.

ANTONYMS FOR retain

OTHER WORDS FROM retain

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for retainable

  • Kent went with her obediently, but not without wondering why she had sent for him, of all the retainable lawyers in the capital.

    The Grafters|Francis Lynde

British Dictionary definitions for retainable

retain
/ (rɪˈteɪn) /

verb (tr)

Derived forms of retain

retainable, adjectiveretainment, noun

Word Origin for retain

C14: from Old French retenir, from Latin retinēre to hold back, from re- + tenēre to hold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012