scathing

[ skey-th ing ]
/ ˈskeɪ ðɪŋ /

adjective

bitterly severe, as a remark: a scathing review of the play.
harmful, injurious, or searing.

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Lincolnesque

Origin of scathing

First recorded in 1785–95; scathe + -ing2

OTHER WORDS FROM scathing

scath·ing·ly, adverb

Definition for scathing (2 of 2)

scathe
[ skeyth ]
/ skeɪð /

verb (used with object), scathed, scath·ing.

to attack with severe criticism.
to hurt, harm, or injure, as by scorching.

noun

hurt, harm, or injury.

Origin of scathe

before 1000; (noun) Middle English scath(e), scade, schath(e) < Old Norse skathi damage, harm, cognate with Old English sc(e)atha malefactor, injury (with which the Middle English forms with sch- might be identified); (v.) Middle English scath(e), skath(e) < Old Norse skatha, cognate with Old English sceathian

OTHER WORDS FROM scathe

scathe·less, adjectivescathe·less·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for scathing

British Dictionary definitions for scathing (1 of 2)

scathing
/ (ˈskeɪðɪŋ) /

adjective

harshly critical; scornfula scathing remark
damaging; painful

Derived forms of scathing

scathingly, adverb

British Dictionary definitions for scathing (2 of 2)

scathe
/ (skeɪð) /

verb (tr)

rare to attack with severe criticism
archaic, or dialect to injure

noun

archaic, or dialect harm

Derived forms of scathe

scatheless, adjective

Word Origin for scathe

Old English sceatha; related to Old Norse skathi, Old Saxon scatho
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012