seize

[ seez ]
/ siz /

verb (used with object), seized, seiz·ing.

verb (used without object), seized, seiz·ing.

Origin of seize

1250–1300; Middle English saisen, seisen < Old French saisir < Medieval Latin sacīre to place (in phrase sacīre ad propriētam to take as one's own, lay claim to) < Frankish, perhaps akin to Gothic satjan to set, put, place

SYNONYMS FOR seize

ANTONYMS FOR seize

Related forms

Synonym study

7. See catch.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for seizer

  • In a similar manner, Hanumant delivers from her curse the ogress of the lake, the seizer (grh) and devourer, who was once a nymph.

  • Bob's first care was to look after Seizer, who was badly wounded, but whose bones were whole.

    The Graysons|Edward Eggleston
  • If the seized property be lost, the seizer shall compensate for the loss in kind or in value.

British Dictionary definitions for seizer

seize

/ (siːz) /

verb (mainly tr)

Derived Forms

seizable, adjective

Word Origin for seize

C13 saisen, from Old French saisir, from Medieval Latin sacīre to position, of Germanic origin; related to Gothic satjan to set 1
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