differentiate

[ dif-uh-ren-shee-eyt ]
/ ˌdɪf əˈrɛn ʃiˌeɪt /
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verb (used with object), dif·fer·en·ti·at·ed, dif·fer·en·ti·at·ing.

verb (used without object), dif·fer·en·ti·at·ed, dif·fer·en·ti·at·ing.

Origin of differentiate

1810–20; < Medieval Latin differentiātus distinguished (past participle of differentiāre), equivalent to Latin different(ia) difference + -ātus -ate1
SYNONYMS FOR differentiate
1 set off.
Related forms

Synonym study

1. See distinguish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for self-differentiating

differentiate

/ (ˌdɪfəˈrɛnʃɪˌeɪt) /

verb

(tr) to serve to distinguish between
(when intr, often foll by between) to perceive, show, or make a difference (in or between); discriminate
(intr) to become dissimilar or distinct
maths to perform a differentiation on (a quantity, expression, etc)
(intr) (of unspecialized cells, etc) to change during development to more specialized forms
Derived Formsdifferentiator, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for self-differentiating

differentiate


v.

1816, from Medieval Latin differentiatus, past participle of differentiare, from Latin differentia (see difference).

Originally a mathematical term; transitive and non-technical sense of "discriminate between" is from 1876. Earlier, difference had been used as a verb in this sense. Related: Differentiated; differentiating; differentiation.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper