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enhance

[en-hans, -hahns]
verb (used with object), en·hanced, en·hanc·ing.
  1. to raise to a higher degree; intensify; magnify: The candlelight enhanced her beauty.
  2. to raise the value or price of: Rarity enhances the worth of old coins.
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Origin of enhance

1325–75; Middle English enhauncen < Anglo-French enhauncer, apparently for Old French enhaucer, equivalent to en- en-1 + haucer “to raise” (French hausser) from the unattested Vulgar Latin altiāre (derivative of Latin altus “high,” with h- < Germanic; see haughty), though -n- is unexplained
Related formsen·hance·ment, nounen·hanc·ive, adjectiveself-en·hance·ment, nounun·en·hanced, adjective

Synonym study

2. See elevate.

Antonyms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for self-enhancement

Historical Examples

  • Together with this must be reckoned a motive seldom absent from human endeavour, the desire for self-exhibition, self-enhancement.

    Ancient Art and Ritual

    Jane Ellen Harrison

  • Utterance of individual emotion is very closely neighboured by, is almost identical with, self-enhancement.

    Ancient Art and Ritual

    Jane Ellen Harrison


British Dictionary definitions for self-enhancement

enhance

verb
  1. (tr) to intensify or increase in quality, value, power, etc; improve; augment
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Derived Formsenhancement, nounenhancer, nounenhancive, adjective

Word Origin

C14: from Old French enhaucier, from en- 1 + haucier to raise, from Vulgar Latin altiāre (unattested), from Latin altus high
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for self-enhancement

enhance

v.

late 13c., anhaunsen "to raise, make higher," from Anglo-French enhauncer, probably from Old French enhaucier "make greater, make higher or louder; fatten, foster; raise in esteem," from Vulgar Latin *inaltiare, from Late Latin inaltare "raise, exalt," from altare "make high," from altus "high" (see old).

Meaning "raise in station, wealth, or fame" attested in English from c.1300. The -h- in Old French supposedly from influence of Frankish *hoh "high." Related: Enhanced; enhancing.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper