shoe

[ shoo ]
/ ʃu /

noun, plural shoes, (especially British Dialect) shoon.

verb (used with object), shod or shoed, shod or shoed or shod·den, shoe·ing.

to provide or fit with a shoe or shoes.
to protect or arm at the point, edge, or face with a ferrule, metal plate, or the like.

Nearby words

  1. shockproof,
  2. shockstall,
  3. shockumentary,
  4. shod,
  5. shoddy,
  6. shoe boil,
  7. shoe is on the other foot, the,
  8. shoe leather,
  9. shoe-shine,
  10. shoe-string

Idioms

Origin of shoe

before 900; (noun) Middle English scho(o), Old English sceō(h), cognate with German Schuh, Old Norse skōr, Gothic skōhs; (v.) Middle English schon, Old English scōg(e)an, cognate with Middle Low German schoi(g)en, Old Norse skūa

Related formsshoe·less, adjectivere·shoe, verb (used with object), re·shod, re·shoe·ing.un·der·shoe, nounun·shoed, adjective

Can be confusedshoe shoo

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for shoe


British Dictionary definitions for shoe

shoe

/ (ʃuː) /

noun

verb shoes, shoeing or shod (tr)

Word Origin for shoe

Old English scōh; related to Old Norse skōr, Gothic skōhs, Old High German scuoh

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for shoe
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with shoe

shoe

In addition to the idiom beginning with shoe

  • shoe is on the other foot, the

also see:

  • comfortable as an old shoe
  • fill someone's shoes
  • goody-two-shoes
  • if the shoe fits
  • in someone's shoes
  • step into someone's shoes
  • wait for the other shoe to drop
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.