cleat

[kleet]

noun

verb (used with object)

to supply or strengthen with cleats; fasten to or with a cleat.

Origin of cleat

1350–1400; Middle English clete wedge, cognate with Old High German klōz lump, ball, Dutch kloot; akin to clot
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for cleat

Historical Examples of cleat

  • This plate is soldered to the shank of the screw-eye and the cleat is complete.

    Boys' Book of Model Boats

    Raymond Francis Yates

  • Now to get a cleat or something across that window so we can take the rope with us!

  • Harvey saw half a dozen knives stuck in a cleat in the hatch combing.

    "Captains Courageous"

    Rudyard Kipling

  • To let go altogether, instead of lowering with a turn on a cleat or bitt-head.

    The Sailor's Word-Book

    William Henry Smyth

  • The posts and cleat are surfaced on four sides, while the other pieces are surfaced on only two sides.

    Mission Furniture

    H. H. Windsor



British Dictionary definitions for cleat

cleat

noun

a wedge-shaped block, usually of wood, attached to a structure to act as a support
a device consisting of two hornlike prongs projecting horizontally in opposite directions from a central base, used for securing lines on vessels, wharves, etc
a short length of angle iron used as a bracket
a piece of metal, leather, etc, attached to the sole of a shoe to prevent wear or slipping
a small triangular-shaped nail used in glazing
any of the main cleavage planes in a coal seam

verb (tr)

to supply or support with a cleat or cleats
to secure (a line) on a cleat

Word Origin for cleat

C14: of Germanic origin, compare Old High German chlōz clod, lump, Dutch kloot ball
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cleat
n.

c.1300, clete "wedge," from Old English *cleat "a lump," from West Germanic *klaut "firm lump" (cf. Middle Low German klot, klute, Middle Dutch cloot, Dutch kloot, Old High German kloz, German kloß "clod, dumpling"). In Middle English, a wedge of wood bolted to a spar, etc., to keep it from slipping (late 14c.). Meaning "thin metal plate for shoes, etc." is c.1825.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper