slicker

1
[ slik-er ]
/ ˈslɪk ər /

noun

a long, loose oilskin raincoat.
any raincoat.
Informal.
  1. a swindler; a sly cheat.
  2. city slicker.

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Origin of slicker

1
First recorded in 1880–85; slick1 + -er1

OTHER WORDS FROM slicker

slick·ered, adjective

Definition for slicker (2 of 3)

slicker2
[ slik-er ]
/ ˈslɪk ər /

noun

a tool, usually of stone or glass, for scraping, smoothing, and working tanning agents into a skin or hide.

Origin of slicker

2
First recorded in 1850–55; slick2 + -er1

Definition for slicker (3 of 3)

slick1
[ slik ]
/ slɪk /

adjective, slick·er, slick·est.

noun

adverb

smoothly; cleverly.

Origin of slick

1
1300–50; Middle English slike (adj.); cognate with dialectal Dutch sleek even, smooth; akin to slick2

OTHER WORDS FROM slick

slick·ly, adverbslick·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for slicker

British Dictionary definitions for slicker (1 of 2)

slicker
/ (ˈslɪkə) /

noun

informal a sly or untrustworthy person (esp in the phrase city slicker)
US and Canadian a shiny raincoat, esp an oilskin
a small trowel used for smoothing the surfaces of a mould

Derived forms of slicker

slickered, adjective

British Dictionary definitions for slicker (2 of 2)

slick
/ (slɪk) /

adjective

noun

verb (tr)

Derived forms of slick

slickly, adverbslickness, noun

Word Origin for slick

C14: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Icelandic, Norwegian slikja to be or make smooth
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012