smacking

[ smak-ing ]
/ ˈsmæk ɪŋ /

adjective

smart, brisk, or strong, as a breeze.
Chiefly British Slang. smashing.

Nearby words

  1. sm,
  2. sm.,
  3. sm. c.,
  4. sma,
  5. smaak,
  6. smack dab,
  7. smack-dab,
  8. smackdown,
  9. smacker,
  10. smackeroo

Origin of smacking

First recorded in 1585–95; smack2 + -ing2

Related formssmack·ing·ly, adverb

smack

1
[ smak ]
/ smæk /

noun

a taste or flavor, especially a slight flavor distinctive or suggestive of something: The chicken had just a smack of garlic.
a trace, touch, or suggestion of something.
a taste, mouthful, or small quantity.

verb (used without object)

to have a taste, flavor, trace, or suggestion: Your politeness smacks of condescension.

Origin of smack

1
before 1000; (noun) Middle English smacke, Old English smæc; cognate with Middle Low German smak, German Geschmack taste; (v.) Middle English smacken to perceive by taste, have a (specified) taste, derivative of the noun; compare German schmacken

Origin of smack

2
1550–60; imitative; compare Dutch, Low German smakken, German (dial.) schmacken

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for smacking


British Dictionary definitions for smacking

smacking

/ (ˈsmækɪŋ) /

adjective

brisk; livelya smacking breeze

smack

1
/ (smæk) /

noun

a smell or flavour that is distinctive though faint
a distinctive trace or touchthe smack of corruption
a small quantity, esp a mouthful or taste

verb (intr foll by of)

to have the characteristic smell or flavour (of something)to smack of the sea
to have an element suggestive (of something)his speeches smacked of bigotry

Word Origin for smack

Old English smæc; related to Old High German smoc, Icelandic smekkr a taste, Dutch smaak

smack

2
/ (smæk) /

verb

noun

adverb informal

directly; squarely
with a smack; sharply and unexpectedly

Word Origin for smack

C16: from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch smacken, probably of imitative origin

smack

3
/ (smæk) /

noun

a slang word for heroin

Word Origin for smack

C20: perhaps from Yiddish schmeck

smack

4
/ (smæk) /

noun

a sailing vessel, usually sloop-rigged, used in coasting and fishing along the British coast
a fishing vessel equipped with a well for keeping the catch alive

Word Origin for smack

C17: from Low German smack or Dutch smak, of unknown origin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for smacking
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for smacking

smack

[ smăk ]

n.

Heroin.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.