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sot

[sot]
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noun
  1. a drunkard.
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Origin of sot

before 1000; Middle English: fool, Old English sott < Medieval Latin sottus < ?
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for sot

sponge, alcoholic, tippler, drunk, lush, inebriate, boozer, wino, drinker, carouser, guzzler, dipsomaniac

Examples from the Web for sot

Historical Examples of sot

  • And she sot off for the school-house that evenin' a-walkin' a foot.

    Samantha Among the Brethren, Part 4.

    Josiah Allen's Wife (Marietta Holley)

  • Maybe it's because I hain't hed much to do with 'em that I'm sot on 'em.

  • Wall, I sot down a minnit to think it over, and then the trouble commenced.

  • And she was sot and he was sotter, and at last they quarreled.

    The Depot Master

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • A feller gits sort of sot in his ways, and it's hard to give in to the other chap.

    Cap'n Eri

    Joseph Crosby Lincoln


British Dictionary definitions for sot

sot

1
noun
  1. a habitual or chronic drunkard
  2. a person stupefied by or as if by drink
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Derived Formssottish, adjective

Word Origin for sot

Old English, from Medieval Latin sottus; compare French sot a fool

sot

2
adverb
  1. Scot indeed: used to contradict a negative statementI am not! — You are sot!
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Word Origin for sot

a variant of so 1, altered to rhyme with not
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sot

n.

late Old English sott "stupid person, fool," from Old French sot, from Gallo-Romance *sott- (cf. Medieval Latin sottus, c.800), of uncertain origin, with cognates from Portugal to Germany. Surviving meaning "one who is stupefied with drink" first recorded 1590s. As a verb, it is attested from c.1200, but usually besot.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper