sot

[sot]

Origin of sot

before 1000; Middle English: fool, Old English sott < Medieval Latin sottus < ?
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for sots

Historical Examples of sots


British Dictionary definitions for sots

sot

1
noun
  1. a habitual or chronic drunkard
  2. a person stupefied by or as if by drink
Derived Formssottish, adjective

Word Origin for sot

Old English, from Medieval Latin sottus; compare French sot a fool

sot

2
adverb
  1. Scot indeed: used to contradict a negative statementI am not! — You are sot!

Word Origin for sot

a variant of so 1, altered to rhyme with not
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sots

sot

n.

late Old English sott "stupid person, fool," from Old French sot, from Gallo-Romance *sott- (cf. Medieval Latin sottus, c.800), of uncertain origin, with cognates from Portugal to Germany. Surviving meaning "one who is stupefied with drink" first recorded 1590s. As a verb, it is attested from c.1200, but usually besot.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper