sound

3
[ sound ]
/ saʊnd /

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

noun

Surgery. a long, slender instrument for sounding or exploring body cavities or canals.

Nearby words

  1. soulless,
  2. soullessly,
  3. soulmate,
  4. soult,
  5. soult, nicolas jean de dieu,
  6. sound and the fury, the,
  7. sound as a bell,
  8. sound barrier,
  9. sound bite,
  10. sound block

Origin of sound

3
1300–50; Middle English sounden < Old French sonder to plumb, derivative of sonde sounding line < ?

Related formssound·a·ble, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for sound out

sound out

verb

(tr, adverb) to question (someone) in order to discover (opinions, facts, etc)

sound

1
/ (saʊnd) /

noun

verb

See also sound off

Derived Formssoundable, adjective

Word Origin for sound

C13: from Old French soner to make a sound, from Latin sonāre, from sonus a sound

sound

2
/ (saʊnd) /

adjective

adverb

soundly; deeply: now archaic except when applied to sleep
Derived Formssoundly, adverbsoundness, noun

Word Origin for sound

Old English sund; related to Old Saxon gisund, Old High German gisunt

sound

3
/ (saʊnd) /

verb

to measure the depth of (a well, the sea, etc) by lowering a plumb line, by sonar, etc
to seek to discover (someone's views, etc), as by questioning
(intr) (of a whale, etc) to dive downwards swiftly and deeply
med
  1. to probe or explore (a bodily cavity or passage) by means of a sound
  2. to examine (a patient) by means of percussion and auscultation

noun

med an instrument for insertion into a bodily cavity or passage to dilate strictures, dislodge foreign material, etc
See also sound out

Word Origin for sound

C14: from Old French sonder, from sonde sounding line, probably of Germanic origin; related to Old English sundgyrd sounding pole, Old Norse sund strait, sound 4; see swim

sound

4
/ (saʊnd) /

noun

a relatively narrow channel between two larger areas of sea or between an island and the mainland
an inlet or deep bay of the sea
the air bladder of a fish

Word Origin for sound

Old English sund swimming, narrow sea; related to Middle Low German sunt strait; see sound ³

Sound

/ (saʊnd) /

noun

the Sound a strait between SW Sweden and Zealand (Denmark), linking the Kattegat with the Baltic: busy shipping lane; spanned by a bridge in 2000. Length of the strait: 113 km (70 miles). Narrowest point: 5 km (3 miles)Danish name: Øresund Swedish name: Öresund
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sound out
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Science definitions for sound out

sound

1
[ sound ]

A type of longitudinal wave that originates as the vibration of a medium (such as a person's vocal cords or a guitar string) and travels through gases, liquids, and elastic solids as variations of pressure and density. The loudness of a sound perceived by the ear depends on the amplitude of the sound wave and is measured in decibels, while its pitch depends on its frequency, measured in hertz.
The sensation produced in the organs of hearing by waves of this type. See Note at ultrasound.

sound

2
[ sound ]

A long, wide inlet of the ocean, often parallel to the coast. Long Island Sound, between Long Island and the coast of New England, is an example.
A long body of water, wider than a strait, that connects larger bodies of water.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with sound out

sound out

Seek the views or intentions of, as in We'd better sound out Mom about who's using the station wagon, or Let's sound out the staff before we decide which week we should close for vacation. This expression derives from sound meaning “to measure the depth of water by lowering a line or lead.” It was transferred to other kinds of inquiry in the late 1500s, but out was not added for several centuries.

sound

In addition to the idioms beginning with sound

  • sound as a bell
  • sound bite
  • sound off
  • sound out

also see:

  • safe and sound
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.